Yellow Jessamine

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Gelsemium sempervirens is the Botanical name for the Yellow Jessamine. This is an attractive climbing plant with a twining habit which means the stems twine around objects so the plant can reach higher. It is an evergreen best suited for temperate and warmer climates, and has masses of small yellow flowers in Spring, which look great against the glossy deep green leaves, and the flowers have a lovely fragrance. Yellow Jessamine is also the state flower of South Carolina in the USA. The nectar from the flowers attracts birds and other pollinators, but all parts of the plant are toxic to humans.

You can grow this plant on a trellis or pergola for privacy, or to hide a wall, or also in pots ,with a support in place for the plant. Plant it in a sunny spot for the best flower display, and it will grow quite quickly. This plant was growing in a Sydney garden where it enjoyed the heat from a brick wall. New 6 157.jpgNew 6 156.jpgNew 6 158.jpg

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Lovely flowers my friend and Gelsemium sempervirens, commonly called false jasmine or false jessamine, is an evergreen twining vine that is native from Virginia to Florida west to Texas and Central America. It is typically found in open woods, thickets and along roads. Bright, fragrant, funnel-shaped, yellow flowers (to 1.5” long) appear either solitary or in clusters (cymes) in late winter to early spring (February – April depending on location).


http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/FullImageDisplay.aspx?documentid=23910

Flowers often serve as a demonstrative signal that winter is coming to an end. As a vine, false jasmine grows on wiry reddish-brown stems to 20’ long. As a bushy ground cover, it grows to 3’ tall and will sprawl somewhat indefinitely by runners. Shiny, lanceolate, light green leaves (to 1-3” long) are evergreen, but may develop yellow to purple hues in winter.


http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/FullImageDisplay.aspx?documentid=10100

Plants are semi-evergreen toward the northern limits of their growing range. Flowers and foliage are poisonous if ingested. The name of this vine is varyingly spelled as jasmine or jessamine. Carolina jessamine was named the official flower of South Carolina in 1924.


https://www.pinterest.ru/pin/167125836147621963/visual-search/?x=16&y=12&w=530&h=397
Genus name comes from the Latinized version of gelsomino the Italian name for jasmine.

Specific epithet means ever green.


https://www.datuopinion.com/gelsemiaceae

Problems
No serious insect or disease problems.

Garden Uses
Grow as a vine on a trellis, arbor, pergola, fence or wall. Good porch cover. Formal ground cover. Informal ground cover for slopes or banks where it can sprawl and naturalize.


https://hubpages.com/health/cure-dementia

Containers for patios where it can sprawl over the sides. Climb into smaller trees where early flowering is especially noticeable. Thank you @ctrl-alt-nwo

A source of information:
http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFinderDetails.aspx?kempercode=c519

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Fav. comment Award ! Very nice Pics and information.

Yellow jessamine is a climbing vine that is native to the southeastern United States. It is known by several names, including Carolina jessamine, poor man's rope, or yellow jasmin. It has also been known as "The Pride of Augusta," because it is found abundantly near Augusta, Georgia. Yellow jessamine is the state flower of South Carolina and it appears on that state's quarter along with the Carolina wren and the cabbage palmetto.

Yellow jessamine is particularly noticeable because it has showy, yellow flowers that appear in late winter or early spring when few other plants are in bloom. In some strains of the plant, the flowers are very fragrant and send a sweet, prevailing scent through the wintery woods.

http://www.sfrc.ufl.edu/extension/4h/plants/Yellow_jessamine/index.html

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Fav. comment Award ! Well chosen Pics ! Thanks.

Yellow jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens) is the South Carolina State Flower. Yellow jessamine bloom on a high-climbing, woody vine. Yellow jessamine plant is a landscape plant.Yellow jessamine flowers are clusters of bright yellow, fragrant, tubular blossoms, with flared petals. Yellow jessamine bloom from December to March.

Yellow Jessamine is called by several names like Carolina jessamine, poor man's rope, or yellow jasmine and as The Pride of Augusta, Evening Trumpetflower, Gelber Jasmin, Jasmin sauvage, Sariyasemin . Yellow Jessamine's characteristic feature is its sweet, prevailing scent through the wintery woods. Yellow Jessamine is common in the coastal plains and Piedmont regions from Virginia to South Florida and west to Arkansas and Texas.

Source: https://www.theflowerexpert.com/content/aboutflowers/stateflowers/south-carolina-state-flowers

Yellow jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens) became our official state flower in March 14,1924. Because it is native to our state, it is also called Carolina jessamine. Other names include trumpet vine, evening trumpet flower, and both yellow jasmine and Carolina Jasmine. (Jessamine and jasmine are two variations of the same word, and both are acceptable and accurate names for this plant. Here we refer to it as jessamine since that is how it is spelled in Joint Resolution No. 534, which established the flower as an emblem of South Carolina nearly a century ago.)

Jessamine is an evergreen vine that climbs trees, fences, and latticework all over our state. It blooms in very late winter or early spring, offering the first hope of warm weather to come! This flower loves sun and can grow quite fast given plenty of space and moist, well-drained soil.

https://www.sciway.net/facts/sc-state-flower-yellow-jessamine.html

Very bright yellow flowers with perfume too! I really must have a look for this yellow jasmine in Bangkok! This is the first time I have heard of this type of jasmine!

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Actually, it's not really a Jasmine, although "Jessamine" is close to it, and it is fragrant like a Jasmine too.

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LOL. This just shows how the mind refused to see the fact tughtbin front and preferred to translate according to what’s familiar!
Yes, I did see Jessamine but I thought it was just another name for common jasmine with yellow colour! Nice to know that the flowers has the same jasmine fragrance.

Interesting, beautiful and very useful for human plants. Gelsemium SEMPERVIRENS - Evergreen Gelsemia.
Virginia or yellow jasmine, Jasmine Carolina.
Very popular in landscaping liana. Blooms profusely in early spring, the flowers are bright, fragrant. Helzemia is recognized as the state flower of South Carolina. Widely used in medicine.
A fast-growing evergreen woody vine, with thin twisting branches.
Leaves are supremely full lanceolate leathery, dark green shiny, up to 10 cm long.
The flowers are bright yellow, very fragrant, up to 5 cm long, collected in dense inflorescences. Corolla right bell-shaped five-bladed. Its fragrant flowers are among the earliest in spring.

http://adenium-doma.ru/shop/781/desc/gelsemium-sempervirens

@ctrl-alt-nwo,
I saw this plant at my country! I think it's common here! And also famous in gardening as well! Stunning photography and description! Your botanical knowledge is extremely useful for all of us to get a clear idea about what we should plant in our garden! Really appreciate it!

Cheers~

That's looks so elegant great to know about this plant really fascinating it was :)

wow you get really A LOT of comments!! that is awesome man!

here is my little comment without much information of these plants but FULL OF GOOD VIBES!! because you know... life is beautiful!! and we have to live it at 100%

Beautiful plant, @ctrl-alt-nwo! The name ‘jasmine’ comes from the Italian word, gelsomino, which together with the southern French word jensemie and Catalan word gessami are derived from the Persian/Arabic yasamin or yasemin. In ancient Greece, iásminon was described as ‘a fragrant oil from Persia’. The species name sempervirens derives from the Latin semper meaning ’always‘ and virens meaning ‘green’.

Yellow Jasmine was used by the Native Americans in what are now the southern states of the United States for so-called ’divine judgements‘ and in order to commit murder by poisoning.

People poisoned by Yellow Jasmine become paralysed yet remain fully conscious with eyes open. They cannot move, but are aware of everything going on around them. The Othomi tribe use the word bé-í meaning ‘cessation of movement’ to describe the typical Gelsemium tetanus and the word bebo-sito, meaning ‘glass coffin’ to describe the poisonous drink made from gelsemium.root

Botanical characteristics
Yellow Jasmine is a creeping plant with thin shoots which grow up to five metres in length from a tuberous, vigorous root stock. The shoots are in part woody and are profusely branched. They bear lanceolate, dark green, glossy, opposite leaves. In the leaf axils of the upper shoots stand the bright yellow, 4cm to 5cm long, fragrant flowers. The five-lobed calyx has a trumpet-shaped margin. The fruit is a hanging, light brown capsule with a paper-like shell and roundish flat-winged seeds.

Yellow Jasmine flowers from April to May.

Habitat
Yellow Jasmine is native to the southern Atlantic states of the USA and Central America, thriving in the forests and on the coast of Virginia, Florida, Texas, Mexico, and Guatemala.

Some species of Jasmine are cultivated in southern France and southern Anatolia for their essential oil, which is used in perfumes

Preparation
A.Vogel/Bioforce uses a homoeopathic mother tincture produced in accordance with the current Homöopathisches Arzneibuch (HAB (New Official German Homoeopathic Pharmacopoeia) from the fresh, underground parts of Gelsemium sempervirens (L.) Jaume St.-Hill.

Potentising of the dilutions is carried out manually.

A source: https://www.avogel.ch/en/plant-encyclopaedia/gelsemium_sempervirens.php

wow it's been so long since i saw yellow Jessamine and those are looking just great , look like you are taking good care of them

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Greetings @ctrl-alt-nwo That was such a beautiful flowers,i always love those flowers with fragrances.

Is that flowers will vine also to the ground?

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They can grow on the ground, until they find something to climb !

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ohw..that was great,that plants look familiar but the flower are in different shapes..

outstanding as always..plse. see the lates just up..very bullish indeed for the metals..thnx.

Yellow Jessamine - exceptionally delicate and wonderfully composed in beautiful gardens. They give so much joy with their miniature flowers. :)

Greetings my friend

The yellow Carolina jasmine (or "jessamine") is an attractive evergreen vine that tends to remain bushy and compact when grown in bright sun. When shaded though, it will climb up and over adjacent shrubs and trees to heights of more than 20 ft (6.1 m) in its quest for sunlight. The glossy rich green leaves are narrow oblongs with pointed tips and are 2-3 in (5.1-10.2 cm) long by 0.5 in (1.3 cm) wide.

They are held in opposite pairs along smooth wiry reddish-brown stems. Small clusters of fragrant yellow tubular flowers are produced from late winter to early spring depending on location and temperature. The showy blossoms are about 2 in (5.1 cm) long and have a flared mouth 1 in (2.5 cm) in diameter.
Gelsemium sempervirens is native to the southeastern United States. Carolina jasmine is widely grown as an ornamental in mild climate areas.


Usage
Carolina jasmine will rapidly cover arbors, tree trunks, trellises, etc. in a season or two. This is a well behaved vine that will stay in scale and can be used on decks and porches and on trellises near patios and entryways. It grows well in containers and as ground cover along steep banks. Carolina jasmine is a good candidate for low maintenance landscapes.

This fast growing evergreen vine is easy to grow and readily available. The sight of Carolina jessamine's (a variant spelling of "jasmine") happy yellow flowers is one of our first signs of spring. The wiry reddish brown stems are flexible and inspire another common name for this vine,"poor man's rope" (because it breaks easily so only poor men use it)

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This is a nice plant to have for a shade @ctrl-alt-nwo because of its thick leaves along with beautiful yellow flowers.

Very beautiful weaving plant. Her yellow flowers look great Respect.

The beautiful Jessamine love the warm walls👍

Lively attractive climber.

Well they do really look beautiful and I have seen them as well ;)
They sure are a beauty to watch by the way.

all those yellow in between green does really makes it even more beautiful.

Carolina jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens) is one of the most beautiful vines of the South. It covers fences and trees in open woodlands and along roadsides throughout the Southeast with its slender vines and bright yellow flowers. It is the state flower of South Carolina.

Sweetly scented, golden yellow flowers cover the cascading, fine textured foliage from February to April. The trumpet-shaped blooms have 5 lobes, are 1 to 1½ inches long, and are attractive to both butterflies and bumblebees. The shiny evergreen leaves are 1 to 3 inches long on 10-to-20-foot tall vines.

Carolina jessamine is easy to grow. It is attractive on an arbor where the slender branches hung with yellow flowers can be seen from below. This plant will stay in scale and can be used on decks and porches and near patios and entryways. It is good in containers and as a ground cover along steep banks to help control erosion.

https://hgic.clemson.edu/factsheet/carolina-jessamine/

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Family: Gelsemiaceae
Genus: Gelsemium (jel-SEM-ee-um) (Info)
Species: sempervirens (sem-per-VY-renz) (Info)
Synonym: Bignonia sempervirens
Synonym: Gelsemium lucidum
Synonym: Gelsemium nitidum
Synonym: Jeffersonia sempervirens

source

Yellow jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens) became our official state flower in March 14,1924. Because it is native to our state, it is also called Carolina jessamine. Other names include trumpet vine, evening trumpet flower, and both yellow jasmine and Carolina Jasmine. (Jessamine and jasmine are two variations of the same word, and both are acceptable and accurate names for this plant. Here we refer to it as jessamine since that is how it is spelled in Joint Resolution No. 534, which established the flower as an emblem of South Carolina nearly a century ago.
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Jessamine is an evergreen vine that climbs trees, fences, and latticework all over our state. It blooms in very late winter or early spring, offering the first hope of warm weather to come! This flower loves sun and can grow quite fast given plenty of space and moist, well-drained soil.
Carolina-confederate-jasmine-gelsemium-sempervirens-stock-image.jpg
When the US Mint decided to release quarters for each of the states, it was decided that Yellow Jessamine would appear on South Carolina's quarter, along with the palmetto tree and the Carolina Wren (our state bird).
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Source.

@ctrl-alt-nwo, In my opinion Spring season always bring the beauty to our surroundings because genuinely it reflects as nature becomes more lively in the Spring season. And yellow flowers cannot hide from eyes because these holds the different eye-catching effect.

In my opinion, for this plant Brick Wall is suiting. And it's reflecting as these flowers are naturally sticked to the wall and it's reflecting as these are decorated on these Brick Walls. I am sure that whoever will watch this, they will going to get the Inspiration to plant these kind of breathtaking and beautiful plants.

Wishing you an great day and stay blessed. 🙂

Super. It also would look great if too lazy to repaint a wall :-)

Gelsemium sempervirens

margarita-carolina-jessamine-gelsemium-sempervirens-carolina-yellow-jasmine-flowers.jpg

Growth

Carolina_jessamine_shrub_--_Gelsemium_sempervirens.jpg
Carolina jasmine or Carolina jessamine -- Gelsemium sempervirens

Gelsemium sempervirens can grow to 3–6 m (9.8–19.7 ft) high when given suitable climbing support in trees, with thin stems. The leaves are evergreen, lanceolate, 5–10 cm (2.0–3.9 in) long and 1–1.5 cm (0.39–0.59 in) broad, and lustrous, dark green. The flowers are borne in clusters, the individual flowers yellow, sometimes with an orange center, trumpet-shaped, 3 cm (1.2 in) long and 2.5–3 cm (0.98–1.18 in) broad. Its flowers are strongly scented and produce nectar that attracts a range of pollinators.[3]

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Medical use Edit
Historically Gelsemium sempervirens was used as a topical to treat papulous eruptions. It was also used to treat measles, neuralgic otalgia, tonsillitis, esophagitis, dysmenorrhea, muscular rheumatism, headaches.[8]

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gelsemium_sempervirens

Yellow jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens) is the official flower of the state of South Carolina that was established in 1924.
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Jessamine was found throughout South Carolina and "the soft flowers show the purity of gold; the return of eternal winter shows the lesson in deep determination, loyalty and deception." patriotism State service "(quote from the South Carolina legislature). Yellow jessamine was also displayed in the South Carolina quarter.
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Yellow jessamine is an annual plant that always lives from native vines in the southeastern United States (sometimes referred to as "Carolina jasmine"). Beautiful but all parts of the plant are toxic.

All image from Pinterest!

Source

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Gelsemium sempervirens is utilized in homeopathy for treating patients with tension related side effects, anyway there have been couple of test considers assessing its pharmacological movement. We have explored the impacts of homeopathic measurements of G. sempervirens on mice, utilizing approved social models. Centesimal (CH) weakenings/dynamizations of G. sempervirens, the reference sedate diazepam (1 mg/kg body weight) or a fake treatment (dissolvable vehicle) were intraperitoneally conveyed to gatherings of mice of CD1 strain amid 8 days, at that point the impacts were surveyed by the Light-Dark (LD) decision test and by the Open-Field (OF) investigation test, in a completely visually impaired way. In the LD test, the interim spent in the lit up zone by control and fake treatment treated creatures was 15.98%, for mice treated with diazepam it expanded to 19.91% (P = .047), while with G. sempervirens 5 CH it was 18.11% (P = .341, non-noteworthy). The quantity of changes between the two compartments expanded with diazepam from 6.19 to 9.64 (P < .001) however not with G. Sempervirens. In the OF test, G. sempervirens 5 CH fundamentally expanded the time spent and the separation went in the focal zone (P = .009 and P = .003, resp.), while diazepam had no impact on these OF test parameters. In a consequent arrangement of investigations, G. sempervirens 7 and 30 CH likewise altogether enhanced the conduct reactions of mice in the OF test (P < .01 for every single tried variable). Neither weakenings of G. sempervirens influenced the aggregate separation voyaged, showing that the social impact was not because of unspecific changes in locomotor action. All in all, homeopathic measurements of G. sempervirens impact the passionate reactions of mice to novel situations, proposing a change in exploratory conduct and a reduction of thigmotaxis or neophobia.
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https://www.hindawi.com/journals/ecam/2011/362517/

Despite the heady, familiar perfume and the funnel-shaped flowers, yellow jasmine (Gelsemium sempervirens) is not a true jasmine and is also known as false jasmine or yellow jessamine.

The evergreen plant is a twining vine native to North America that thrives in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 7 though 10. Brilliant yellow blossoms arrive in late winter like a signal that spring is just around the corner, yet don't let their cheery color fool you: all parts of the plant can be poisonous if eaten.


Vine
Yellow jasmine will twine its way up to 20 feet wide if given an appropriate support. Its wiry brown stems twine up trees or trellises, producing along the way shiny leaves, light-green and oval, that can develop yellow and purple tones in cool weather.

This vine is adaptable and resilient, often found in the wild in abandoned fields, mounting into the tops of pine forests. The fragrant butter-yellow blossoms generally appear in February, although blossoms can appear as late as April in cooler climates.


Arbor
As the vine matures, its stems spread laterally to 3 to 6 feet wide. With proper training, the yellow jasmine vine can cover an arbor, trellis, fence, wall or pergola. It also works well as a porch cover where the blossoms attract hummingbirds and spicebush swallowtail butterflies.

Yellow jasmine must be planted in full sun for it to flower profusely, and, given enough sun and warmth, a second wave of flowers can reappear again in autumn.

source

Born in the South, Gelsemium sempervirens, commonly called the Carolina jessamine is a terrific native vine for Carolina landscapes. Admired for its sweetly scented, canary yellow flowers, this vine really puts on a show from February to April, depending on weather.

The golden, trumpet-shaped blooms are 1½ inches long and seen in small clusters, with narrow, glossy evergreen foliage. The foliage bronzes in winter.

Carolina jessamine is tolerant of wind, short periods of drought and moderately salt tolerant.

Carolina jessamine can be trained to arbors and trellises, and is often found in wooded areas growing up tree trunks. The jessamine has a modest growth rate until well-established; it generally takes three to four growing seasons for the vines to cover an average-sized arbor.

This landscape plant will become 20 feet or taller when allowed to grow untrained. Occasionally, older jessamine vines become top heavy or sparse. This can be remedied by pruning the vines soon after they finish flowering. The Carolina jessamine is the state flower of South Carolina.

source

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carolina-jessamine-heysmokies.jpg
Common Name: Carolina yellow jasmine
Type: Vine
Family: Gelsemiaceae
Native Range: Southern United States, Mexico, Guatemala
Zone: 7 to 10
Height: 12.00 to 20.00 feet
Spread: 3.00 to 6.00 feet
Bloom Time: February to April
Bloom Description: Yellow
Sun: Full sun
Water: Medium
Maintenance: Low
Flower: Showy, Fragrant
JESSAMINE.jpg
Culture

Winter hardy to USDA Zones 7-10 where it is best grown in moist, organically rich, well-drained soils in full sun. Tolerates light shade, but best flowering and growth occur in full sun. Plants will grow as a twining vine or if unsupported as a bushy ground cover. Plants may survive winter in the Missouri boot heel but not in St. Louis.
Picture-Jasmine-Carolina-6.jpg
Noteworthy Characteristics

Gelsemium sempervirens, commonly called false jasmine or false jessamine, is an evergreen twining vine that is native from Virginia to Florida west to Texas and Central America. It is typically found in open woods, thickets and along roads. Bright, fragrant, funnel-shaped, yellow flowers (to 1.5” long) appear either solitary or in clusters (cymes) in late winter to early spring (February – April depending on location).
Source

Yellow jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens) is the South Carolina State Flower. Yellow jessamine bloom on a high-climbing, woody vine. Yellow jessamine plant is a landscape plant.

Yellow jessamine flowers are clusters of bright yellow, fragrant, tubular blossoms, with flared petals. Yellow jessamine bloom from December to March. Yellow Jessamine is frequently used as a ground cover or a trellis decoration.

Kingdom
Plantae
Phylum
Embryophyta
Class
Magnoliopsida
Order
Gentianales
Family
Gelsemiaceae
Genus
Gelsemium (trumpetflower)
Species
Gelsemium sempervirens


Yellow Jessamine is called by several names like Carolina jessamine, poor man's rope, or yellow jasmine and as The Pride of Augusta, Evening Trumpetflower, Gelber Jasmin, Jasmin sauvage, Sariyasemin . Yellow Jessamine's characteristic feature is its sweet, prevailing scent through the wintery woods.

Yellow Jessamine is common in the coastal plains and Piedmont regions from Virginia to South Florida and west to Arkansas and Texas.

source

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Carolina Yellow Jessamine
Carolina yellow jessamine (or jasmine) is the state flower of South Carolina. This plant is a twining vine that is native to the Southeast US, so it is well-adapted to our LA climate. Carolina yellow jessamine can grow up to 3-6 meters high when given suitable climbing support. The leaves are evergreen and a beautiful dark green. The trumpet-shaped yellow flowers arise in clusters and sometimes have an orange center. The flowers are strongly scented and produce nectar that attracts a range of pollinators.

Historically, this plant was used as a topical to treat the symptoms of measles, tonsillitis, and headaches. However, all parts of this plant exude chemicals that are toxic to people and animals, so should not be consumed. The nectar is also toxic to honeybees, which may cause brood death when the nectar is gathered by the bees and brought back to their hive. Despite the potential hazards, this is a popular garden plant in the south and is frequently trained to cover walls.

eing a native plant it tends to be hardy and well-adapted in the residential or commercial landscape. Established native plants can grow with little to no fertilizer and pesticides, and may require little to no irrigation. In this way, native plants generally help protect water resources, allowing gardeners to reduce fertilizers, pesticides, and irrigation practices which otherwise can contribute to stormwater runoff pollution and degradation of downstream water quality.

http://greenmandan.com/carolina-yellow-jessamine/

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YELLOW JASMINE - "GELSEMIUM SEMPERVIRENS"

One of the South's most fragrant plants. Beautiful and easy to grow, yellow jasmine is a semi-evergreen climbing vine which blooms in early spring and again in the fall. The plant is known by several names, including Carolina jasmine, evening trumpetflower, yellow jessamine and its formal botanical name, Gelsemium sempervirens. Though it is lovely, all parts of the yellow jasmine plant are highly poisonous. The notion that the nectar from this plant poisons bees or contaminates honey is false. Bees are able to metabolize naturally occurring toxic nectars, into a safe food source for themselves and their brood. Read more about Green Chapels Bee Research here.

HISTORY:
The native Algonquin tribes of the Carolinas, made great use of this lovely plant. A tincture of the flowers in fermented fruit, was used to treat Malaria and other Fevers (or "Ague" from the Algonquin), a mosquito-born infectious disease. Malaria was a plague to early settlers in the Americas, into modern times, with the last case being reported in 1940. The Algonquins used their native medicines to survive diseases like Malaria for centuries, which speaks volumes to their effectiveness. The Algonquins also used Gelsemium Sempervirens as a weapon. They poisoned the water sources of their enemies, and administered a tea made from the leaves, to paralyze an enemy so that they might be tortured without losing consciousness.
In 2011, Gelsemium was used to poison and kill Chinese billionaire Long Liyuan. The plant was added to a stew by a disgruntled business associate. (Guangdong province)

GROWTH HABIT:
Yellow jasmine has fine, trailing tendrils which are easily trained up a trellis or other support. Individual vines can reach 15 to 20 feet in length within several years. New leaves appear just before the plant flowers. leaves darken to a bronze-green in winter. Leaves persist throughout the winter unless temperatures are unusually low.

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http://www.wildthingsgrow.com/yellow-jessamine-gelsemium-sempervirens.html

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Gelsemium sempervirens is a twining vine in the family Gelsemiaceae, native to subtropical and tropical America: Honduras, Guatemala, Belize, Mexico (Chiapas, Oaxaca, Veracruz, Puebla, Hidalgo), and southeastern and south-central United States (from Texas to Virginia). It has a number of common names including yellow jessamine or jasmine, Carolina jasmine or jessamine, evening trumpetflower, gelsemium and woodbine.
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Source
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Source
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Source
Gelsemium sempervirens can grow to 3–6 m (9.8–19.7 ft) high when given suitable climbing support in trees, with thin stems. The leaves are evergreen, lanceolate, 5–10 cm (2.0–3.9 in) long and 1–1.5 cm (0.39–0.59 in) broad, and lustrous, dark green. The flowers are borne in clusters, the individual flowers yellow, sometimes with an orange center, trumpet-shaped, 3 cm (1.2 in) long and 2.5–3 cm (0.98–1.18 in) broad. Its flowers are strongly scented and produce nectar that attracts a range of pollinators. Source

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So pretty flower!There are more than 200 varieties of plants belonging to either the Oleaceae family of true jasmine or the Loganiaceae family of false jasmine. The flowers of the former are nontoxic if eaten. Within the Loganiaceae family, the flowers of gelsemium sempervirens Loganiaceae, also known as yellow jasmine, yellow jessamine or Carolina jasmine, are highly poisonous. When eaten they may cause a wide range of side effects in humans, animals and bees.

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Carolina jasmine (gelsemium sempervirens) is a native plant common across the southeastern states. Blooming between December and May, its pleasant fragrance, climbing habit and abundant yellow trumpet-shaped flowers make it desirable enough as a garden plant that it's been named South Carolina's official state flower. However, every part of Carolina jasmine, including its flowers, is poisonous. Carolina jasmine contains gelseminine, gelsemoidin and gelsemine, alkaloids of the strychnine family, with the highest alkaloid concentrations found in the roots and flowers. The honey made from the flowers' nectar, according to both the Medical Toxicology of Natural Substances and the Mississippi Department of Wildlife, is potentially toxic to humans.

Source:

https://www.hunker.com › side-effects-of...

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Gelsemium sempervirens

Jasminum-nudiflorum.jpg

Common Name: Carolina yellow jasmine
Type: Vine
Family: Gelsemiaceae
Native Range: Southern United States, Mexico, Guatemala
Zone: 7 to 10
Height: 12.00 to 20.00 feet
Spread: 3.00 to 6.00 feet
Bloom Time: February to April
Bloom Description: Yellow
Sun: Full sun
Water: Medium
Maintenance: Low
Flower: Showy, Fragrant

Allamanda-costa-farms-blooming-tropical.jpg

Culture
Winter hardy to USDA Zones 7-10 where it is best grown in moist, organically rich, well-drained soils in full sun. Tolerates light shade, but best flowering and growth occur in full sun. Plants will grow as a twining vine or if unsupported as a bushy ground cover. Plants may survive winter in the Missouri boot heel but not in St. Louis. If attempted in the St. Louis area, it should be sited in a protected location insulated from winter winds.

Noteworthy Characteristics
Gelsemium sempervirens, commonly called false jasmine or false jessamine, is an evergreen twining vine that is native from Virginia to Florida west to Texas and Central America. It is typically found in open woods, thickets and along roads. Bright, fragrant, funnel-shaped, yellow flowers (to 1.5” long) appear either solitary or in clusters (cymes) in late winter to early spring (February – April depending on location). Flowers often serve as a demonstrative signal that winter is coming to an end. As a vine, false jasmine grows on wiry reddish-brown stems to 20’ long. As a bushy ground cover, it grows to 3’ tall and will sprawl somewhat indefinitely by runners. Shiny, lanceolate, light green leaves (to 1-3” long) are evergreen, but may develop yellow to purple hues in winter. Plants are semi-evergreen toward the northern limits of their growing range. Flowers and foliage are poisonous if ingested. The name of this vine is varyingly spelled as jasmine or jessamine. Carolina jessamine was named the official flower of South Carolina in 1924.

Genus name comes from the Latinized version of gelsomino the Italian name for jasmine.

Specific epithet means ever green.

Hoa_Thang_Giu.jpg

carolina-jessamine.jpg

http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFinderDetails.aspx?kempercode=c519

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Yellow colors flower are eye catching . But this plant is unique. It used in fragrances and medicines . These qualities makes it diffrent . Thanks for the blog

With stems that can exceed 20 feet in length, Carolina jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens) climbs over anything it can twine its wiry stem around. Plant it on trellises and arbors, along fences or under trees with loose canopies.

The glossy leaves stay green all year, providing dense coverage for the supporting structure. Carolina jessamine vines are covered with clusters of fragrant, yellow flowers in late winter and spring.

The flowers are followed by seed capsules that ripen slowly over the remainder of the season. If you want to collect a few seeds to start new plants, pick the capsules in fall after the seeds inside have turned brown.

Air dry them for three or four days and then remove the seeds. They are easy to start indoors in late winter or outdoors in late spring when the soil is thoroughly warm.

source

There are more than 200 varieties of plants belonging to either the Oleaceae family of true jasmine or the Loganiaceae family of false jasmine. The flowers of the former are nontoxic if eaten. Within the Loganiaceae family, the flowers of gelsemium sempervirens Loganiaceae, also known as yellow jasmine, yellow jessamine or Carolina jasmine, are highly poisonous. When eaten they may cause a wide range of side effects in humans, animals and bees.

source

Gelsemium sempervirens
1da84a88c37551a5cf1ae98c4933de71.jpg

Common Name: Carolina yellow jasmine
Type: Vine
Family: Gelsemiaceae
Native Range: Southern United States, Mexico, Guatemala
Zone: 7 to 10
Height: 12.00 to 20.00 feet
Spread: 3.00 to 6.00 feet
Bloom Time: February to April
Bloom Description: Yellow
Sun: Full sun
Water: Medium
Maintenance: Low
Flower: Showy, Fragrant

margarita-carolina-jessamine-gelsemium-sempervirens-carolina-yellow-jasmine-flowers.jpg

Jasminum-nudiflorum.jpg

Noteworthy Characteristics
Gelsemium sempervirens, commonly called false jasmine or false jessamine, is an evergreen twining vine that is native from Virginia to Florida west to Texas and Central America. It is typically found in open woods, thickets and along roads. Bright, fragrant, funnel-shaped, yellow flowers (to 1.5” long) appear either solitary or in clusters (cymes) in late winter to early spring (February – April depending on location). Flowers often serve as a demonstrative signal that winter is coming to an end. As a vine, false jasmine grows on wiry reddish-brown stems to 20’ long. As a bushy ground cover, it grows to 3’ tall and will sprawl somewhat indefinitely by runners. Shiny, lanceolate, light green leaves (to 1-3” long) are evergreen, but may develop yellow to purple hues in winter. Plants are semi-evergreen toward the northern limits of their growing range. Flowers and foliage are poisonous if ingested. The name of this vine is varyingly spelled as jasmine or jessamine. Carolina jessamine was named the official flower of South Carolina in 1924.

http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFinderDetails.aspx?kempercode=c519

Thanks for the information sir this is a species of vine native to Central America and North America.

Gelsemium sempervirens 'Margarita'Carolina jessamine
images-6.jpg

Native to North America

FIRST IMPRESSIONS: Gelsemium sempervirens ‘Margarita’ is a striking native vine. Plants have glossy lance shaped evergreen leaves and an abundance of fragrant yellow trumpet shaped flowers. This vigorous twining vine thrives in moist soils in full sun to part shade.

HABITAT & HARDINESS: Gelsemium sempervirens ranges through the southeastern United States from USDA Zones 7-9. Plants occur from Virginia to Florida and west to east Texas.

The cultivar ‘Margarita’ was selected for its large showy flowers by Don Jacobs of Eco Gardens in Decatur, Georgia. Jacobs named the plant for his wife and introduced it into the nursery trade. It has since proven to have superior cold tolerance and is hardy from USDA Zones 6-9.

This vine is indigenous to woodland edges, thickets, roadsides, pine forests, open woods and roadsides.
images-3.jpg

PLANT DESCRIPTION: Gelsemium sempervirens ‘Margarita’ is a fast growing vine. Plants are supported by their wiry stems which twist around vertical supports or nearby plants. If no support is available, vines will sprawl on the ground and become a bushy groundcover.

Leaves are opposite and evergreen with a shiny surface. The blades are lance shaped with smooth margins. Foliage is deep green with a bronze or purplish winter color.

In spring waxy funnel shaped blossoms are borne in profusion. The flowers are arranged in showy 2-3” axillary clusters. Their intense vanilla like fragrance attracts a variety of pollinators.

Flowers mature into an inconspicuous flat pod.

Plants grow 10-20’ or taller if suitable vertical support is available.

CULTURAL & MAINTENANCE NEEDS: Gelsemium sempervirens thrives in sun or part shade in rich moist soil or average garden soil. Plants tolerate periods of drought and short periods of seasonal flooding

In garden situations this vigorous vine can be trained onto a sturdy trellis. If a pine tree is available, however, the stems will twine between the flat bark plates and grow toward the top without training.

If pruning is needed, schedule it shortly after flowering.

All parts of the plant contain toxins so plants are unpalatable to deer and other herbivores.

LANDSCAPE USES: This is a good choice for a Trellis, Arbor or Fence in Naturalized Areas or Wildlife Gardens. Gelsemium sempervirens ‘Margarita’ has Fragrance and Showy Blooms and can be used as an Accent, in Deer Resistant Plantings, Cottage Gardens, Shade Gardens or on Roadsides.
images-5.jpg

COMPANION & UNDERSTUDY PLANTS: The intense yellow flower color pairs well with blue or purple spring flowering plants like Amsonia ‘Blue Ice’, Iris cristata, Phlox divaricata, Sisyrinchium angustifolium 'Suwannee' or Viola walteri ‘Silver Gem’.

Lonicera sempervirens is a native evergreen vine that can be planted in similar cultural situations.

TRIVIA: The flowers, leaves, and roots contain poisonous strychnine-related alkaloids and may be lethal to humans and livestock. The floral nectar may also be toxic to honeybees if too much is consumed.
de-gele-bloemen-van-jasmine-gelsemium-sempervirens-68341889.jpg

Gelsemium sempervirens 'Margarita' received a Gold Medal from the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society for its cold hardiness.

Gelsemium sempervirens is the state flower of South Carolina.

The word Gelsemium comes from the Italian word for jasmine - gelsomino. The nomenclature is due to the intense fragrance of the flowers.
images-4.jpg

Height:10-20 ft

Spread:3-6 ft
J
USDA Hardiness Zone:7-9

Bloom Color:Yellow

Gelsemium sempervirens 'Margarita' Characteristics

ExposureFull Sun to Partial Shade

AttributesFragrant

Flowering MonthsJune

Foliage ColorGreen

Salt ToleranceMedium

Soil Moisture PreferenceMoist

il_fullxfull.739004777_i7v4_1024x1024.jpg
[Source]<www.newmoonnursery.com/plant/Gelsemium-sempervirens-Margari>

Festooning fences and trees with its slender vines and bright yellow flowers, Yellow Jessamine, sometimes called Carolina Jessamine, is one of the most beautiful vines of the South.


These trailing or climbing woody vines are quite common in the Southeast in open woodlands and thickets, and along roadsides; and the blossoms occur in sufficient numbers to make the plant quite showy.


The evergreen leaves are in pairs one to three inches long, entire, and pointed at the tips. Yellow Jessamine begins blooming in February to early March. The fragrant flowers are funnel-shaped with five spreading, rounded lobes. It is easy to grow and can be used in many ways. Do not be tempted to chew the leaves as they contain a toxic compound.

Several different shrubs and vines with fragrant flowers have been called Jasmine. This plant gets its botanical name from the Latinized form of gelsemina, the Italian name for the true jasmine.

It is the State Flower of South Carolina.

source

Kingdom : Plant
Phylum : Magnoliophyta
Class : Magnoliopsida
Order : Gentianales
Family : Loganiaceae
Genus : Gelsemium
Species : sempervirens (L.) Aiton

Common name : Yellow jessamine, evening trumpet flower

source

To many South Carolinians, the sweet fragrance of the Yellow Jessamine signals the welcome return of spring. Each year after the cold of winter dissipates; yellow flowers emerge on the climbing vine of the South Carolina state flower.

Though attractive in their own right, these trumpet-shaped blooms are better known for their sweet, dreamy and even spircy perfume. The Jessamine’s unmistakeable fragrance is no doubt one reason the plant was chosen as the state flower.

When the flower was selected in 1924, lawmakers in Columbia noted it was “indigenous to every nook and corner of the state.” Though the Jessamine grows abundantly throughout several southeastern states, South Carolinians proudly claim the flower is at its best in their state.

Around Charleston and North Charleston, the flowers of the Jessamine adorn suburban gardens and yards. The vine winds its way along trellises or lattice structures of woven wood commonly used to support climbing plants in gardens.


The Yellow Jessamine even snakes along the land as a ground cover. South Carolina’s state flower is also called the “mailbox plant” because residents in many neighborhoods use it to attractively cover mailbox posts. While the Yellow Jessamine puts on a good show in gardens and yards, its floral “shows” in the wild are equally outstanding. The vine climbs up tree trunks, winds around branches then hangs down like a blanket covering a tree.

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71Td%2BCpVnUL.SX425.jpg

Despite its sweet name and delicate perfume, the South Carolina state flower is quite poisonous. Deer and other wildlife avoid it and bees that drink its nectar have killed off entire hives. Children who mistake the Jessamine’s nectar for Honeysuckle have also become ill from it.

source

Natural History
Tubular flowers of yellow jessamine in early spring
Photo credit: Mary Keim (Flickr ID Mary Keim).
Used under a Creative Commons license. Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 Generic License


Yellow jessamine is a climbing vine that is native to the southeastern United States. It is known by several names, including Carolina jessamine, poor man's rope, or yellow jasmin.

It has also been known as "The Pride of Augusta," because it is found abundantly near Augusta, Georgia. Yellow jessamine is the state flower of South Carolina and it appears on that state's quarter along with the Carolina wren and the cabbage palmetto.

Yellow jessamine is particularly noticeable because it has showy, yellow flowers that appear in late winter or early spring when few other plants are in bloom. In some strains of the plant, the flowers are very fragrant and send a sweet, prevailing scent through the wintery woods.

source

Wow so very beautiful garden, thanks for sharing.really nice for lovely Bluebells and flowers.....
Resteem

Wow really amazing photography. good article
For your post propagation.
Upvote/Resteem

Great tips here i think i will add some of those to my garden , will do it with few colors

To many South Carolinians, the sweet fragrance of the Yellow Jessamine signals the welcome return of spring. Each year after the cold of winter dissipates; yellow flowers emerge on the climbing vine of the South Carolina state flower. Though attractive in their own right, these trumpet-shaped blooms are better known for their sweet, dreamy and even spircy perfume. The Jessamine’s unmistakeable fragrance is no doubt one reason the plant was chosen as the state flower.
south-carolina-post-image2.jpg
When the flower was selected in 1924, lawmakers in Columbia noted it was “indigenous to every nook and corner of the state.” Though the Jessamine grows abundantly throughout several southeastern states, South Carolinians proudly claim the flower is at its best in their state. Around Charleston and North Charleston, the flowers of the Jessamine adorn suburban gardens and yards. The vine winds its way along trellises or lattice structures of woven wood commonly used to support climbing plants in gardens.

The Yellow Jessamine even snakes along the land as a ground cover. South Carolina’s state flower is also called the “mailbox plant” because residents in many neighborhoods use it to attractively cover mailbox posts. While the Yellow Jessamine puts on a good show in gardens and yards, its floral “shows” in the wild are equally outstanding. The vine climbs up tree trunks, winds around branches then hangs down like a blanket covering a tree.

Despite its sweet name and delicate perfume, the South Carolina state flower is quite poisonous. Deer and other wildlife avoid it and bees that drink its nectar have killed off entire hives. Children who mistake the Jessamine’s nectar for Honeysuckle have also become ill from it.
south-carolina-hero.jpg

https://www.proflowers.com/blog/south-carolina-state-flower-the-yellow-jessamine

SC State Flower – Yellow Jessamine

Yellow jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens) became our official state flower in March 14,1924. Because it is native to our state, it is also called Carolina jessamine. Other names include trumpet vine, evening trumpet flower, and both yellow jasmine and Carolina Jasmine. (Jessamine and jasmine are two variations of the same word, and both are acceptable and accurate names for this plant. Here we refer to it as jessamine since that is how it is spelled in Joint Resolution No. 534, which established the flower as an emblem of South Carolina nearly a century ago.)
carolina-jessamine-close-up.jpg

Jessamine is an evergreen vine that climbs trees, fences, and latticework all over our state. It blooms in very late winter or early spring, offering the first hope of warm weather to come! This flower loves sun and can grow quite fast given plenty of space and moist, well-drained soil.

When the US Mint decided to release quarters for each of the states, it was decided that Yellow Jessamine would appear on South Carolina's quarter, along with the palmetto tree and the Carolina Wren (our state bird).
sc-state-flower-yellow-jessamine.jpg

Important* – Although jessamine's delicate, funnel-shaped blossoms are beautiful and fragrant, these flowers are poisonous! Touching them can produce an allergic reaction, and eating them can be fatal. Be careful not to mistake them with flowers such as honeysuckle, which contain a sweet and unharmful nectar.

https://www.sciway.net/facts/sc-state-flower-yellow-jessamine.html

Beautiful plant, @ctrl-alt-nwo! The name ‘jasmine’ comes from the Italian word, gelsomino, which together with the southern French word jensemie and Catalan word gessami are derived from the Persian/Arabic yasamin or yasemin. In ancient Greece, iásminon was described as ‘a fragrant oil from Persia’. The species name sempervirens derives from the Latin semper meaning ’always‘ and virens meaning ‘green’.
781_7.jpg

Interesting, beautiful and very useful for human plants. Gelsemium SEMPERVIRENS - Evergreen Gelsemia.
Virginia or yellow jasmine, Jasmine Carolina.
Very popular in landscaping liana. Blooms profusely in early spring, the flowers are bright, fragrant. Helzemia is recognized as the state flower of South Carolina. Widely used in medicine.
A fast-growing evergreen woody vine, with thin twisting branches.
Leaves are supremely full lanceolate leathery, dark green shiny, up to 10 cm long.
The flowers are bright yellow, very fragrant, up to 5 cm long, collected in dense inflorescences. Corolla right bell-shaped five-bladed. Its fragrant flowers are among the earliest in spring.

c94195.jpg
source
Medical use
Historically Gelsemium sempervirens was used as a topical to treat papulous eruptions. It was also used to treat measles, neuralgic otalgia, tonsillitis, esophagitis, dysmenorrhea, muscular rheumatism, headaches

na-usa-south-carolina-mt-pleasant-yellow-jessamine-at-gated-entry-A7MY73.jpg
source

Yellow_Lilium_PNG_Clipart_Picture.png
source


yellow jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens) is the South Carolina State Flower. Yellow jessamine bloom on a high-climbing, woody vine. Yellow jessamine plant is a landscape plant.Yellow jessamine flowers are clusters of bright yellow, fragrant, tubular blossoms, with flared petals

Yellow jessamine bloom from December to March. Yellow Jessamine is frequently used as a ground cover or a trellis decoration.


ellow Jessamine is called by several names like Carolina jessamine, poor man's rope, or yellow jasmine and as The Pride of Augusta, Evening Trumpetflower, Gelber Jasmin, Jasmin sauvage, Sariyasemin .

Yellow Jessamine's characteristic feature is its sweet, prevailing scent through the wintery woods.


Yellow Jessamine is common in the coastal plains and Piedmont regions from Virginia to South Florida and west to Arkansas and Texas.
Yellow jessamine was officially adopted as the South Carolina State Flower by the General Assembly on February 1, 1924.
Yellow jessamine has been used by herbalists to treat eye ailments and as natural, perfumed hair oil.
Yellow Jessamine plant is very poisonous. Preparations made from the roots and rhizomes have been used as central nervous-system depressants, febrifuge, anodyne, and antispasmodic.

sorce:
https://www.theflowerexpert.com/content/aboutflowers/stateflowers/south-carolina-state-flowers

Gelsemium sempervirens
carolina-jessamine-close-up.jpg
Gelsemium sempervirens (L.) W.T. Aiton
Carolina Jessamine, Yellow Jessamine, Evening Trumpetflower, Poor Man's Rope
Loganiaceae (Logania Family)
Synonym(s): Bignonia sempervirens, Bigonia sempervirens
USDA Symbol: gese
USDA Native Status: L48 (N)
LMP_IMG0285.JPG
Native from Virginia and Florida west to Arkansas and east Texas and south to Guatemala, Carolina Jessamine is a twining, evergreen vine, 10-20 ft. long, that will climb trees, scramble over fences and structures, or develop a mound of tangled stems if left to its own devices. Lustrous, dark-green foliage develops a slight yellow or purple cast in winter. Axillary clusters of very fragrant, yellow, trumpet-shaped flowers. The fruit is a 1 1/2 in. long capsule.
RCM_IMG1264.JPG
This high-climbing vine is very common in parts of the South, frequently found in abandoned fields and climbing high into the canopies of pine forests. It is quite adaptable and tenacious, with no serious disease or insect problems. These qualities, along with its glossy, evergreen leaves and waxy, trumpet-shaped flowers, have made it a mainstay of the suburban landscape in the Southeast. The flowers, leaves, and roots are poisonous and may be lethal to humans and livestock. The species nectar may also be toxic to honeybees if too much is consumed and honey made from Carolina Jessamine nectar may be toxic to humans. Rankins Yellow Jessamine, also known as Swamp Jessamine (G. rankinii), with odorless flowers, occurs in swamps from North Carolina to Florida.
SCB_IMG0094.JPG
https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=gese

carolina-jessamine-close-up.jpg
Abstract
Gelsemium sempervirens is used in homeopathy for treating patients with anxiety related symptoms, however there have been few experimental studies evaluating its pharmacological activity. We have investigated the effects of homeopathic doses of G. sempervirens on mice, using validated behavioral models. Centesimal (CH) dilutions/dynamizations of G. sempervirens, the reference drug diazepam (1 mg/kg body weight) or a placebo (solvent vehicle) were intraperitoneally delivered to groups of mice of CD1 strain during 8 days, then the effects were assessed by the Light-Dark (LD) choice test and by the Open-Field (OF) exploration test, in a fully blind manner. In the LD test, the mean time spent in the illuminated area by control and placebo-treated animals was 15.98%, for mice treated with diazepam it increased to 19.91% (P = .047), while with G. sempervirens 5 CH it was 18.11% (P = .341, non-significant). The number of transitions between the two compartments increased with diazepam from 6.19 to 9.64 (P < .001) but not with G. Sempervirens. In the OF test, G. sempervirens 5 CH significantly increased the time spent and the distance traveled in the central zone (P = .009 and P = .003, resp.), while diazepam had no effect on these OF test parameters. In a subsequent series of experiments, G. sempervirens 7 and 30 CH also significantly improved the behavioral responses of mice in the OF test (P < .01 for all tested variables). Neither dilutions of G. sempervirens affected the total distance traveled, indicating that the behavioral effect was not due to unspecific changes in locomotor activity. In conclusion, homeopathic doses of G.
sc-state-flower-yellow-jessamine.jpg

One of the South's most fragrant plants. Beautiful and easy to grow, yellow jasmine is a semi-evergreen climbing vine which blooms in early spring and again in the fall. The plant is known by several names, including Carolina jasmine, evening trumpetflower, yellow jessamine and its formal botanical name, Gelsemium sempervirens. Though it is lovely, all parts of the yellow jasmine plant are highly poisonous. The notion that the nectar from this plant poisons bees or contaminates honey is false. Bees are able to metabolize naturally occurring toxic nectars, into a safe food source for themselves and their brood. Read more about Green Chapels Bee Research here.

4052700_orig.png
Beautiful plant, @ctrl-alt-nwo! The name ‘jasmine’ comes from the Italian word, gelsomino, which together with the southern French word jensemie and Catalan word gessami are derived from the Persian/Arabic yasamin or yasemin. In ancient Greece, iásminon was described as ‘a fragrant oil from Persia’. The species name sempervirens derives from the Latin semper meaning ’always‘ and virens meaning ‘green’.
781_7.jpg

Interesting, beautiful and very useful for human plants. Gelsemium SEMPERVIRENS - Evergreen Gelsemia.
Virginia or yellow jasmine, Jasmine Carolina.
Very popular in landscaping liana. Blooms profusely in early spring, the flowers are bright, fragrant. Helzemia is recognized as the state flower of South Carolina. Widely used in medicine.
A fast-growing evergreen woody vine, with thin twisting branches.
Leaves are supremely full lanceolate leathery, dark green shiny, up to 10 cm long.
The flowers are bright yellow, very fragrant, up to 5 cm long, collected in dense inflorescences. Corolla right bell-shaped five-bladed. Its fragrant flowers are among the earliest in spring.

c94195.jpg
source
Medical use
Historically Gelsemium sempervirens was used as a topical to treat papulous eruptions. It was also used to treat measles, neuralgic otalgia, tonsillitis, esophagitis, dysmenorrhea, muscular rheumatism, headaches

na-usa-south-carolina-mt-pleasant-yellow-jessamine-at-gated-entry-A7MY73.jpg
source

Yellow_Lilium_PNG_Clipart_Picture.png
source

@ctrl-alt-nwo
wow nice post. wonderful garden .this is great article & nice photography
##Upvote/Resteem

One of the South's most fragrant plants. Beautiful and easy to grow, yellow jasmine is a semi-evergreen climbing vine which blooms in early spring and again in the fall. The plant is known by several names, including Carolina jasmine, evening trumpetflower, yellow jessamine and its formal botanical name, Gelsemium sempervirens. Though it is lovely, all parts of the yellow jasmine plant are highly poisonous. The notion that the nectar from this plant poisons bees or contaminates honey is false. Bees are able to metabolize naturally occurring toxic nectars, into a safe food source for themselves and their brood. Read more about Green Chapels Bee Research here.

4052700_orig.png
Beautiful plant, @ctrl-alt-nwo! The name ‘jasmine’ comes from the Italian word, gelsomino, which together with the southern French word jensemie and Catalan word gessami are derived from the Persian/Arabic yasamin or yasemin. In ancient Greece, iásminon was described as ‘a fragrant oil from Persia’. The species name sempervirens derives from the Latin semper meaning ’always‘ and virens meaning ‘green’.
781_7.jpg

Interesting, beautiful and very useful for human plants. Gelsemium SEMPERVIRENS - Evergreen Gelsemia.
Virginia or yellow jasmine, Jasmine Carolina.
Very popular in landscaping liana. Blooms profusely in early spring, the flowers are bright, fragrant. Helzemia is recognized as the state flower of South Carolina. Widely used in medicine.
A fast-growing evergreen woody vine, with thin twisting branches.
Leaves are supremely full lanceolate leathery, dark green shiny, up to 10 cm long.
The flowers are bright yellow, very fragrant, up to 5 cm long, collected in dense inflorescences. Corolla right bell-shaped five-bladed. Its fragrant flowers are among the earliest in spring.

c94195.jpg
source
Medical use
Historically Gelsemium sempervirens was used as a topical to treat papulous eruptions. It was also used to treat measles, neuralgic otalgia, tonsillitis, esophagitis, dysmenorrhea, muscular rheumatism, headaches

na-usa-south-carolina-mt-pleasant-yellow-jessamine-at-gated-entry-A7MY73.jpg
source

Yellow_Lilium_PNG_Clipart_Picture.png
source


Carolina Jessamine Native to the South and the state flower of South Carolina, Carolina jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens) is commonly seen trained over doorways, bay windows, on walls and fences, and up lamp posts and mailboxes. In the wild, we spot its yellow blooms peeking down at us from tree branches. It climbs by twining its thin, pliable stems around something, so it needs a support. Unlike wisteria and some other vines, however, it won't crush the structure it's growing on.

https://www.southernliving.com/garden/grumpy-gardener/jesssamine-and-jasmine-two-fine-wines

  ·  작년

Yellow jessamine is a climbing vine that is native to the southeastern United States. It is known by several names, including Carolina jessamine, poor man's rope, or yellow jasmin. It has also been known as "The Pride of Augusta," because it is found abundantly near Augusta, Georgia. Yellow jessamine is the state flower of South Carolina and it appears on that state's quarter along with the Carolina wren and the cabbage palmetto.
gelsemium_top.jpg
Yellow jessamine is particularly noticeable because it has showy, yellow flowers that appear in late winter or early spring when few other plants are in bloom. In some strains of the plant, the flowers are very fragrant and send a sweet, prevailing scent through the wintery woods.
gelsemium02_sm.jpg

From a distance, this plant can be easily confused with the invasive, non-native cat's-claw vine (Dolichandra unguis-cati), which climbs trees in similar habitats and also produces a similar display of bright yellow flowers. Both vines have opposite leaves, but the leaves of cat's-claw vine are compound, while the leaves of yellow jessamine are simple. In addition, cat's-claw vine blooms later in the springtime after yellow jessamine flowers have already disappeared. It is not likely that both vines would ever be in bloom in the same place at the same time.
gelsemium04_sm.jpg
Jessamine is easy to grow and is used as a landscape plant. It is often seen vining around mailboxes with its wiry stems and attractive blossoms. It can be cultivated in full sun to grow fuller, denser plants and is frequently used as a ground cover or a trellis decoration.

Yellow jessamine has been used by herbalists to treat eye ailments and as natural, perfumed hair oil. The essential oils of the plant are extracted for use in the perfume industry, since the pleasant odor is difficult to reproduce synthetically.

All parts of this plant are extremely poisonous, especially to livestock, if eaten; however, the bright yellow spring blossoms are a source of nectar for butterflies and deer often browse on the vegetation for food and fiber.

http://www.sfrc.ufl.edu/extension/4h/plants/Yellow_jessamine/index.html

Gelsemium sempervirens can grow to 3–6 m (9.8–19.7 ft) high when given suitable climbing support in trees, with thin stems. The leaves are evergreen, lanceolate, 5–10 cm (2.0–3.9 in) long and 1–1.5 cm (0.39–0.59 in) broad, and lustrous, dark green. The flowers are borne in clusters, the individual flowers yellow, sometimes with an orange center, trumpet-shaped, 3 cm (1.2 in) long and 2.5–3 cm (0.98–1.18 in) broad. Its flowers are strongly scented and produce nectar that attracts a range of pollinators.[3]
4052700_orig.png6225715_orig.pnggelsemium_top.jpggelsemium02_sm.jpg

GELSEMIUM
OTHER NAME(S): Bignonia sempervirens, Carolina Jasmine, Evening Trumpet Flower, False Jasmine, Faux Jasmin, Gelsémie, Gelsémie Toujours Verte, Gelsemii Rhizoma, Gelsemin, Gelsemio, Gelsemium nitidum, Gelsemium sempervirens, Gelsemium Toujours Vert, Gelsemiumwurzelstock Jessamine, Gou Min, Jasmin de Caroline, Jasmin Jaune, Jasmin Nid d’Abeilles, Jasmin de Virginie, Trumpet Flower, Woodbine, Yellow Jasmine, Yellow Jessamine Root.
image.png

Overview Information
Gelsemium is a plant. Some people call it “woodbine.” This can be confusing because American ivy and honeysuckle are also known as “woodbine.” If you want gelsemium, look for its scientific name, which is Gelsemium sempervirens, Gelsemium nitidum, or Bignonia sempervirens.

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https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-455/gelsemium

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This jasmine is also beautiful

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Teri maa ki chut
Teri maa ka bhosda
Maa ke lowde
Randi
Madarchod

CarolinaYellowJessamine101.jpg

Stunning blossoms my companion and Gelsemium sempervirens, usually called false jasmine or false jessamine, is an evergreen twining vine that is local from Virginia to Florida west to Texas and Central America. It is regularly found in open woods, bushes and along streets. Splendid, fragrant, pipe formed, yellow blooms (to 1.5" long) show up either singular or in bunches (cymes) in pre-spring to late-winter (February – April relying upon area).

Blossoms frequently fill in as a definite flag that winter is reaching an end. As a vine, false jasmine develops on wiry ruddy dark colored stems to 20' long. As a thick ground cover, it develops to 3' tall and will sprawl to some degree uncertainly by sprinters. Sparkly, lanceolate, light green leaves (to 1-3" long) are evergreen, yet may create yellow to purple tints in winter.

Plants are semi-evergreen toward the northern furthest reaches of their developing extent. Blooms and foliage are harmful whenever ingested. The name of this vine is varyingly spelled as jasmine or jessamine. Carolina jessamine was named the official bloom of South Carolina in 1924.

Variety name originates from the Latinized rendition of gelsomino the Italian name for jasmine.

Particular appellation implies ever green.

Issues

No genuine creepy crawly or illness issues.

Garden Uses

Develop as a vine on a trellis, arbor, pergola, fence or divider. Great patio cover. Formal ground cover. Casual ground cover for slants or banks where it can sprawl and naturalize.

Jasmine-nudiflorum_grande.jpg

1da84a88c37551a5cf1ae98c4933de71.jpg

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Such a wonderful wonderful plant sir this is very attractive thank you so much sir for yet another amazing blog post from you.

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FAMILY: LOGANIACEAE
ALTERNATE COMMON NAME: mailbox plant
LEAVES: simple, opposite paired; persistent; lance- shaped; shiny, entire; 1-2” x 1/2-3/4”
FLOWER: yellow, showy flowers; axillary; tubular, 1” long; fragrant; March to June
FRUIT: capsule; oblong, abruptly pointed; two-celled; many-winged seed
TWIGS:
FORM: twining vine
HABITAT: moist woods, fence rows; "mailbox plant"
WETLAND DESIGNATION: In the "Western Gulf Coast Subregion" of the Atlantic and Gulf Coast Plain Region, this species is Facultative Upland (FACU): Usually occurs in non-wetlands, but may occur in wetlands. In the remainder of the Atlantic and Gulf Coast Plain Region, this species is Facultative (FAC): Occurs in wetlands or non-wetlands.

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These flowers are looking awesome sir you always brings something special always sir thank you so much.

Gelsemium sempervirens

6729307481_3c40e0be35_b.jpg

Gelsemium sempervirens is a twining vine in the family Gelsemiaceae, native to subtropical and tropical America: Honduras, Guatemala, Belize, Mexico (Chiapas, Oaxaca, Veracruz, Puebla, Hidalgo),[3] and southeastern and south-central United States (from Texas to Virginia).[4] It has a number of common names including yellow jessamine or jasmine,[5][6] Carolina jasmine or jessamine,[5][6] evening trumpetflower,[6][7] gelsemium[6] and woodbine.[6]

Jasminum-Mesnyi.jpg

Scientific classification edit
Kingdom:
Plantae
Clade:
Angiosperms
Clade:
Eudicots
Clade:
Asterids
Order:
Gentianales
Family:
Gelsemiaceae
Genus:
Gelsemium
Species:
G. sempervirens

margarita-carolina-jessamine-gelsemium-sempervirens-carolina-yellow-jasmine-flowers.jpg

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gelsemium_sempervirens

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I admire the smell of jasmine. Jasmine tea is my favorite tea. we had a big bush in the garden and he started up a lot of kids. I wanted to clear the area a bit. I had to abandon this idea. So young shoots grew densely. clean it was unrealistically difficult. You know a lot about plants, if you let me ask, is this a hobby or is it your profession?

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It is one of my professions, along with Financial markets.

Gelsemium sempervirens

margarita-carolina-jessamine-gelsemium-sempervirens-carolina-yellow-jasmine-flowers.jpg

Common Name(s):
Carolina jasmine, Carolina jessamine, Yellow jessamine
Cultivar(s):
Flava, Leo, Major Wheeler, Margapata, Pride of Augusta (double flowers)
Categories:
Groundcover, Native Plants, Poisonous Plants, Vines
Comment:
Born in the South, Gelsemium sempervirens, commonly called the Carolina jessamine is a terrific native vine for Carolina landscapes. Admired for its sweetly scented, canary yellow flowers, this vine really puts on a show from February to April, depending on weather. The golden, trumpet-shaped blooms are 1½ inches long and seen in small clusters, with narrow, glossy evergreen foliage. The foliage bronzes in winter.

Carolina jessamine is tolerant of wind, short periods of drought and moderately salt tolerant.

CarolinaYellowJessamine101.jpg

1200px-Gelsemium_sempervirens3.jpg

Carolina jessamine can be trained to arbors and trellises, and is often found in wooded areas growing up tree trunks. The jessamine has a modest growth rate until well-established; it generally takes three to four growing seasons for the vines to cover an average-sized arbor. This landscape plant will become 20 feet or taller when allowed to grow untrained. Occasionally, older jessamine vines become top heavy or sparse. This can be remedied by pruning the vines soon after they finish flowering. The Carolina jessamine is the state flower of South Carolina.
Jasminum-nudiflorum.jpg

https://plants.ces.ncsu.edu/plants/all/gelsemium-sempervirens/

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Yellow Jessamine is awesome sir it is looking great i am great to be part of this,thanks a lot.

One of the South's most fragrant plants. Beautiful and easy to grow, yellow jasmine is a semi-evergreen climbing vine which blooms in early spring and again in the fall.

The plant is known by several names, including Carolina jasmine, evening trumpetflower, yellow jessamine and its formal botanical name, Gelsemium sempervirens. Though it is lovely, all parts of the yellow jasmine plant are highly poisonous.

The notion that the nectar from this plant poisons bees or contaminates honey is false. Bees are able to metabolize naturally occurring toxic nectars, into a safe food source for themselves and their brood. Read more about Green Chapels Bee Research here.


HISTORY:
The native Algonquin tribes of the Carolinas, made great use of this lovely plant. A tincture of the flowers in fermented fruit, was used to treat Malaria and other Fevers (or "Ague" from the Algonquin), a mosquito-born infectious disease. Malaria was a plague to early settlers in the Americas, into modern times, with the last case being reported in 1940.

The Algonquins used their native medicines to survive diseases like Malaria for centuries, which speaks volumes to their effectiveness. The Algonquins also used Gelsemium Sempervirens as a weapon. They poisoned the water sources of their enemies, and administered a tea made from the leaves, to paralyze an enemy so that they might be tortured without losing consciousness.

In 2011, Gelsemium was used to poison and kill Chinese billionaire Long Liyuan. The plant was added to a stew by a disgruntled business associate. (Guangdong province)

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Beautiful plant, @ctrl-alt-nwo! The name ‘jasmine’ comes from the Italian word, gelsomino, which together with the southern French word jensemie and Catalan word gessami are derived from the Persian/Arabic yasamin or yasemin. In ancient Greece, iásminon was described as ‘a fragrant oil from Persia’. The species name sempervirens derives from the Latin semper meaning ’always‘ and virens meaning ‘green’.
781_7.jpg

Interesting, beautiful and very useful for human plants. Gelsemium SEMPERVIRENS - Evergreen Gelsemia.
Virginia or yellow jasmine, Jasmine Carolina.
Very popular in landscaping liana. Blooms profusely in early spring, the flowers are bright, fragrant. Helzemia is recognized as the state flower of South Carolina. Widely used in medicine.
A fast-growing evergreen woody vine, with thin twisting branches.
Leaves are supremely full lanceolate leathery, dark green shiny, up to 10 cm long.
The flowers are bright yellow, very fragrant, up to 5 cm long, collected in dense inflorescences. Corolla right bell-shaped five-bladed. Its fragrant flowers are among the earliest in spring.

c94195.jpg
source
Medical use
Historically Gelsemium sempervirens was used as a topical to treat papulous eruptions. It was also used to treat measles, neuralgic otalgia, tonsillitis, esophagitis, dysmenorrhea, muscular rheumatism, headaches

na-usa-south-carolina-mt-pleasant-yellow-jessamine-at-gated-entry-A7MY73.jpg
source

Yellow_Lilium_PNG_Clipart_Picture.png
source

  ·  작년

The flowers of the former are nontoxic if eaten. Within the Loganiaceae family, the flowers of gelsemium sempervirens Loganiaceae, also known as yellow jasmine, yellow jessamine or Carolina jasmine, are highly poisonous. When eaten they may cause a wide range of side effects in humans, animals
image (6).png

  ·  작년

Noteworthy Characteristics
Gelsemium sempervirens, commonly called false jasmine or false jessamine, is an evergreen twining vine that is native from Virginia to Florida west to Texas and Central America. It is typically found in open woods, thickets and along roads. Bright, fragrant, funnel-shaped, yellow flowers (to 1.5” long) appear either solitary or in clusters (cymes) in late winter to early spring (February – April depending on location). Flowers often serve as a demonstrative signal that winter is coming to an end. As a vine, false jasmine grows on wiry reddish-brown stems to 20’ long. As a bushy ground cover, it grows to 3’ tall and will sprawl somewhat indefinitely by runners. Shiny, lanceolate, light green leaves (to 1-3” long) are evergreen, but may develop yellow to purple hues in winter. Plants are semi-evergreen toward the northern limits of their growing range. Flowers and foliage are poisonous if ingested.

Thank you for the information. I found out that the plants are medicinal, it is widely used in medicine. Gelzemia, the family of gelzemia or loganievye. In the genus 3 species: elegans, rankinii, sempervirens. Distributed in the southeastern United States; from Virginia to Texas, as well as in Mexico and Guatemala. Evergreen (sempervirens), aka Yellow or Virginian Jasmine. Flowers numerous, appear early in early spring, fragrant. Lanka is very thin, looks like a Solly. It grows unpretentiously. Applied with malaria fever, as a heart sedative, constricting pain in the heart, headache with nasal congestion.
But most often, Gelzemium is used for nervous ailments.

http://boyhuk5.ru/lekarstvennye-travy/gelsemium-lekarstvennye-travy-rasteniya.html

http://sadko.by/shop/jasminum-nudiflorum-zhasmin-zimnij-ili-golocvetkovyj-2/

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A beautiful way to have privacity i mean you can plant them near the walls in your home and you will get a beautiful result plus the privacity that jessamine brings. Regards

An example

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Gelsemium sempervirens is a twining vine in the family Gelsemiaceae, native to subtropical and tropical America: Honduras, Guatemala, Belize, Mexico, and southeastern and south-central United States. Wikipedia
Scientific name: Gelsemium sempervirens
Higher classification: Gelsemium
Did you know: Carolina Wren with Yellow Jessamine - South Carolina's state flower and bird are portrayed in this Anne Worsham Richardson painting, found in many South Carolina homes.

c94195.jpg

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Gelsemium sempervirens can grow to 3–6 m (9.8–19.7 ft) high when given suitable climbing support in trees, with thin stems. The leaves are evergreen, lanceolate, 5–10 cm (2.0–3.9 in) long and 1–1.5 cm (0.39–0.59 in) broad, and lustrous, dark green.

The flowers are borne in clusters, the individual flowers yellow, sometimes with an orange center, trumpet-shaped, 3 cm (1.2 in) long and 2.5–3 cm (0.98–1.18 in) broad. Its flowers are strongly scented and produce nectar that attracts a range of pollinators.

source

Medical use
Historically Gelsemium sempervirens was used as a topical to treat papulous eruptions. It was also used to treat measles, neuralgic otalgia, tonsillitis, esophagitis, dysmenorrhea, muscular rheumatism, headaches

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Gelsemium sempervirens is a twining vine in the family Gelsemiaceae, native to subtropical and tropical America: Honduras, Guatemala, Belize, Mexico (Chiapas, Oaxaca, Veracruz, Puebla, Hidalgo), and southeastern and south-central United States (from Texas to Virginia). It has a number of common names including yellow jessamine or jasmine, Carolina jasmine or jessamine, evening trumpetflower, gelsemium and woodbine.
image-1.png
image.png
photo source
Historically Gelsemium sempervirens was used as a topical to treat papulous eruptions. It was also used to treat measles, neuralgic otalgia, tonsillitis, esophagitis, dysmenorrhea, muscular rheumatism, headaches.
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Woooow...soo cute flower... My dear lovely friend....i love your photography & post 📪..

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Gelsemium sempervirens
Common Name(s):
Carolina jasmine, Carolina jessamine, Yellow jessamine
1200px-Gelsemium_sempervirens3.jpg

1_02af8154-1496-4a4d-9ec0-5de20a275e32.jpg

Flower:
The Carolina jasmine has bright, fragrant, funnel-shaped, yellow flowers (to 1.5” long) that appear either solitary or in clusters (cymes) in late winter to early spring (February – April depending on location). Its flowers often serve as a demonstrative signal that winter is coming to an end. The flowers are followed by a thin, flattened capsule fruit.
Zones:
7-10
Habit:
Evergreen
Site:
Carolina jasmine is winter hardy to USDA Zones 7-10 where it is best grown in moist, organically rich, well-drained soils in full sun. It will tolerate light shade, but best flowering and growth occur in full sun. Plants will grow as a twining vine or if unsupported as a bushy ground cover.
Size:
3 ft. if not allowed-climb with a 20-30 ft. spread
Texture:
Fine to medium
Form:
Twining vine
Exposure:
Sun to partial shade; range of soil types
Fruit:
Yellow flowers in spring; fragrant
Family:
Loganiaceae
Origin:
NC, USA
Distribution:
Piedmont and Coastal Plain.

Jasmine-nudiflorum_grande.jpg

carolina-jessamine.jpg

https://plants.ces.ncsu.edu/plants/all/gelsemium-sempervirens/

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Yellow Jessamine is called by several names like Carolina jessamine, poor man's rope, or yellow jasmine and as The Pride of Augusta, Evening Trumpetflower, Gelber Jasmin, Jasmin sauvage, Sariyasemin . Yellow Jessamine's characteristic feature is its sweet, prevailing scent through the wintery woods.
Carolina_jessamine_shrub_--_Gelsemium_sempervirens.jpg

image (6).png

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gelsemium_sempervirens

Gelsemium sempervirens - (L.)J.St.Hil.
Common Name False Jasmine, Yellow Jessamine, Evening Trumpetflower, Carolina Jasmine
Family Loganiaceae

margarita-carolina-jessamine-gelsemium-sempervirens-carolina-yellow-jasmine-flowers.jpg

Summary
Bloom Color: Yellow. Main Bloom Time: Early summer, Early spring, Late summer, Late spring, Mid summer, Mid spring. Form: Prostrate, Variable height, Variable spread.

Hoa_Thang_Giu.jpg

Physical Characteristics
icon of manicon of climber
Gelsemium sempervirens is an evergreen Climber growing to 3 m (9ft 10in) at a fast rate.
It is hardy to zone (UK) 9. It is in leaf all year, in flower from May to July. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Insects.
Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.

CarolinaYellowJessamine101.jpg

Synonyms
G. nitidum.

Habitats
Woodland Garden Sunny Edge; Dappled Shade; South Wall. By. West Wall. By.

Edible Uses
None known

Medicinal Uses

Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.

https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Gelsemium+sempervirens

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Gelsemium is a plant. Some people call it “woodbine.” This can be confusing because American ivy and honeysuckle are also known as “woodbine.” If you want gelsemium, look for its scientific name, which is Gelsemium sempervirens, Gelsemium nitidum, or Bignonia sempervirens.
s-l640.jpg

gelsemium.jpg
image sources

CarolinaYellowJessamine101.jpg
image source
Despite serious safety concerns, the root and underground stem (rhizome) of gelsemium are used to make medicine. Gelsemium is used as a painkiller for migraineheadaches and for face pain (trigeminal neuralgia) caused by certain facial nerves. It is also used for asthma and other breathing problems.
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State flower. The yellow, or Carolina, jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens) was chosen as state flower by the General Assembly in 1924. In 1923 the legislature appointed a commission to select a floral emblem. Senator Thomas B. Butler and Representatives George B. Ellison and Thomas Savage Heyward recommended the yellow jessamine to the senate and house on February 1, 1924, and it was promptly adopted by both chambers.The legislators observed that the jessamine was “the unanimous selection of . . . the great majority of the ladies of the State who expressed a preference.” Four specific reasons were given for the designation: “(1) It is indigenous to every nook and corner of the State. (2) It is the first premonitor of coming spring. (3) Its fragrance greets us first in the woodland and its delicate flower suggests the pureness of gold. (4) Its perpetual return out of the dead winter suggests the lesson of constancy in, loyalty to, and patriotism in the service of the State.”The yellow jessamine is a twining woody vine with pointed, evergreen leaves. It climbs over bushes, fences, and even tree limbs. Five-petaled, star-shaped yellow flowers bloom from February or March through early May, and the capsule-like fruit matures from September to November. It is common in the South Carolina Piedmont and Sandhills and in the coastal plain from Virginia to Florida, as well as west to Texas and Arkansas. All parts of the plant are poisonous, and even touching it can cause dermatitis. The drug gelsemium was formerly made from the plant and dispensed for the treatment of malaria, but overdoses could be fatal and it is no longer used. Sprigs of jessamine are etched on the steel blade of the Sword of State used by the South Carolina Senate.
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http://www.scencyclopedia.org/sce/entries/yellow-jessamine/

yellow jessamine noun
Definition of yellow jessamine
: a twining North American evergreen shrub (Gelsemium sempervirens of the family Loganiaceae) with fragrant yellow flowers
— called also yellow jasmine

First Known Use of yellow jessamine
1707, in the meaning defined

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They're vines, they're evergreen, they have fragrant and showy flowers, and their names sound alike. If you have something in your garden you want covered fast, they just might be the ticket -- Carolina jessamine and Confederate jasmine.


Carolina Jessamine Native to the South and the state flower
of South Carolina, Carolina jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens) is commonly seen trained over doorways, bay windows, on walls and fences, and up lamp posts and mailboxes.

In the wild, we spot its yellow blooms peeking down at us from tree branches. It climbs by twining its thin, pliable stems around something, so it needs a support. Unlike wisteria and some other vines, however, it won't crush the structure it's growing on.

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Gelsemium sempervirens

Gelsemium_sempervirens_001.JPG

Gelsemium sempervirensAnxietyNeurocytesAnimal modelsHomeopathic medicineBehaviorGene expression

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Introduction
Gelsemium sempervirens L. (here referred as Gelsemium) (Loganaceae) is a medicinal plant used for the treatment of various neuroses in both Homeopathic and Ayurveda systems [1], [2], [3]. All parts of the plant contain the major active principle gelsemine as well as other strychnine-related alkaloids, such as gelseminine and sempervirine [3], [4], [5]. In Homeopathic Materia Medica, Gelsemium is described as a remedy for a variety of neurological and behavioral symptoms including general prostration, drowsiness, tiredness, mental apathy, lack of muscular coordination, and discomfort when confronted with novelty or unfamiliar situations; these symptoms are alleviated by motion and aggravated by emotion and excitement [6] and the practical experience of homeopaths confirms this suggestion [7], [8]. However, evidence of clinical efficacy of Gelsemium and other Homeopathic remedies in humans is still controversial [1], [9], [10]. Our group working at Verona University has explored the action mechanism of Gelsemium on in vivo and in vitro model systems [11], [12], [13], [14], [15]. Evidence from both animal and cellular studies suggested a high sensitivity of central nervous system to this plant effects, that were detected even at extremely low doses and high Homeopathic dilutions (e.g. 5th and 9th centesimal dilution). These studies were never disproved experimentally, but sparked a debate and were the object of comments or critical commentaries concerning the action mechanisms of Gelsemium and the methods of its investigation [16], [17], [18], [19], [20], [21], [22]. In the meantime, the effect of Gelsemium or its alkaloids in neurological and behavioral models were reported by several independent laboratories [1], [23], [24], [25], [26], [27], [28]. Due to the complexity and novelty of the topic, several aspects deserve clarification and the main issues of this debate are here summarized.

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https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0975947616305046

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Prized for its spectacular display of fragrant, bright yellow flowers, this well-mannered vine climbs beautifully on a trellis, arbor or over fences and walls without smothering surrounding trees and shrubs. Allow to sprawl unsupported across slopes and banks as an informal, mounding ground cover. Evergreen to semi-evergreen.

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Very useful flower plant . Yellow colors flowers are very attractive . I think this plant is also useful in some disease in humans . Is it another name night jasmine ?

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No, it is not a Jasmine.

Yellow jessamine is a hardy evergreen flowering vine native to southeastern United States (sometimes referred to erroneously as "Carolina jasmine"). It is beautiful but all parts of the plant are poisonous.

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This plants are awesome yellow is my fav color thank you so much sir for sharing.

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This was the yellow jessamine, the lovely wild jessamine of Florida.

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What a good looking flowers

Gelsemium sempervirens (L.) W.T. Aiton
Carolina Jessamine, Yellow Jessamine, Evening Trumpetflower, Poor Man's Rope
Loganiaceae (Logania Family)
Synonym(s): Bignonia sempervirens, Bigonia sempervirens
USDA Symbol: gese
USDA Native Status: L48 (N)


Native from Virginia and Florida west to Arkansas and east Texas and south to Guatemala, Carolina Jessamine is a twining, evergreen vine, 10-20 ft. long, that will climb trees, scramble over fences and structures, or develop a mound of tangled stems if left to its own devices.

Lustrous, dark-green foliage develops a slight yellow or purple cast in winter. Axillary clusters of very fragrant, yellow, trumpet-shaped flowers. The fruit is a 1 1/2 in. long capsule.

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Yellow jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens) became our official state flower in March 14,1924. Because it is native to our state, it is also called Carolina jessamine. Other names include trumpet vine, evening trumpet flower, and both yellow jasmine and Carolina Jasmine. (Jessamine and jasmine are two variations of the same word, and both are acceptable and accurate names for this plant. Here we refer to it as jessamine since that is how it is spelled in Joint Resolution No. 534, which established the flower as an emblem of South Carolina nearly a century ago.)

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71Td%2BCpVnUL.SX425.jpg

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Homeopathic Doses of Gelsemium sempervirens Improve the Behavior of Mice in Response to Novel Environments.

Jasminum-nudiflorum.jpg

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Abstract
Gelsemium sempervirens is used in homeopathy for treating patients with anxiety related symptoms, however there have been few experimental studies evaluating its pharmacological activity. We have investigated the effects of homeopathic doses of G. sempervirens on mice, using validated behavioral models. Centesimal (CH) dilutions/dynamizations of G. sempervirens, the reference drug diazepam (1 mg/kg body weight) or a placebo (solvent vehicle) were intraperitoneally delivered to groups of mice of CD1 strain during 8 days, then the effects were assessed by the Light-Dark (LD) choice test and by the Open-Field (OF) exploration test, in a fully blind manner. In the LD test, the mean time spent in the illuminated area by control and placebo-treated animals was 15.98%, for mice treated with diazepam it increased to 19.91% (P = .047), while with G. sempervirens 5 CH it was 18.11% (P = .341, non-significant). The number of transitions between the two compartments increased with diazepam from 6.19 to 9.64 (P < .001) but not with G. Sempervirens. In the OF test, G. sempervirens 5 CH significantly increased the time spent and the distance traveled in the central zone (P = .009 and P = .003, resp.), while diazepam had no effect on these OF test parameters. In a subsequent series of experiments, G. sempervirens 7 and 30 CH also significantly improved the behavioral responses of mice in the OF test (P < .01 for all tested variables). Neither dilutions of G. sempervirens affected the total distance traveled, indicating that the behavioral effect was not due to unspecific changes in locomotor activity. In conclusion, homeopathic doses of G. sempervirens influence the emotional responses of mice to novel environments, suggesting an improvement in exploratory behavior and a diminution of thigmotaxis or neophobia.
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https://www.hindawi.com/journals/ecam/2011/362517/

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If there were no jasmine in the world, it would have to be invented. I know few plants that so excite the taste buds with their flavor. There are many flavors, but not everyone wants to taste. Only sage can compete with him, in my opinion.