First CubeSats Aboard for Artemis I Mission

3개월 전

(July 20, 2021; NASA)

The NEA Scout and Lunar IceCube secondary payloads are the first to be installed in the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket’s Orion stage adapter for the Artemis I mission on July 14 at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.
The first two CubeSats are aboard for the Artemis I mission as secondary payloads that will conduct a range of science experiments and technology demonstrations in deep space.
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NEA Scout will be the first CubeSat to travel to an asteroid. The small payload was developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville and the agency’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California.
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Lunar IceCube will search for water ice and other resources from above the surface of the Moon. It was developed by Morehead State University in Kentucky, Busek Space Propulsion and Systems of Massachusetts, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, JPL, and NASA’s Katherine Johnson Independent Verification and Validation Facility in Fairmont, West Virginia. Once deployed, the CubeSat will take up to nine months to arrive at its destination and begin orbiting the Moon.

Read the rest from NASA: First CubeSats Aboard for Artemis I Mission
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Lunar IceCube will search for water ice and other resources from above the surface of the Moon.

How does water or ice get to the moon in space? Do you have any hypothesis on this?

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It went along when the moon broke off from the Earth!

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They used to be attached to each other? I have not yet heard of that.

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I understand the prevailing theory to be that the moon is essentially a big chunk of the Earth. That's likely the reason that the same part of the moon always faces the Earth.

Exciting, huh?

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Is it the one referred to as the giant-impact theory? I just read on it.

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That makes sense because the idea is that something large hit the mass that was the precursor to earth as it is now. A chunk of the planetary mass broke off, and ended up staying gravitationally locked in orbit! 👍