Cancer Metastasis - Metastasi Tumorali

작년

Metastasis

The term "metastasis" refers to the possibility of a tumor process reproducing at a distance in the body, exploiting the invasive properties that the cells assume during their tumor transformation, allowing the tumor to reach any organ systemically and give rise to new neoplastic structures that are called metastases.

374pxMetastasis_sites_for_common_cancers.svg.png

There are essentially three pathways that cancer cells use to give metastases:

Cavity dissemination (or transcelomatic)

This route concerns the possibility of a tumor spreading inside serous cavities, such as the pleural, peritoneal and pericardial cavities.
This happens when the tumor cells, expanding, reach the surface of the organ where they originate, overlooking the serous cavity and here, through the action of protolytic enzymes, one of these cells, or a group of them, detaches from the main mass and falls into the serosa. Once in the serosa the cells will be fluctuating, since they are not attached to any type of extracellular matrix, causing the death of the greatest number of them. Some, instead, which have evolved in such a way as to meet this need, select and survive, finally succeeding in taking root in the mesothelium of the serosa, starting the formation of possible metastasis nuclei.

Once formed, transcelomatic metastases involve a local increase in the factor VEGF, with a consequent increase in capillary permeability leading to exudate and therefore causing edema or dry, in relation to the anatomical district to which it refers. This liquid, rich in proteins, may also contain the same neoplastic cells that are the source of its formation, thus increasing the possibility of their dissemination.
The presence in the exudate of these tumor cells is exploited, through aspiration and subsequent analysis, as a diagnostic tool.

Examples are stomach, colon and ovarian carcinomas that can metastasize in the peritoneal cavity, while carcinomas of the breast, lung and oesophagus in the pleural and/or pericardial cavity.

Lymphatic Dissemination

It represents the most frequent type of dissemination and is mainly favoured by linfoangiogenesis which characterises a neoplastic formation. During the evolutionary processes of tumor growth, a new peritumoral lymphatic network is created whose vessels are characterized, as physiologically occurs in lymphatic vessels, by the presence of a fenestrated endothelium, since their function consists in the drainage of fluids. For this reason, therefore, the neoplastic cells, which already have strong migratory and invasive capacities, can easily penetrate the vessels and exploit the lymphatic network to disseminate.
When cancer cells enter a lymphatic vessel and encounter a lymph node along their path, they are blocked, as morphologically the lymph node acts as a filter and confines them within it. Here the cells can either undergo the action of lymphocytes that eliminate them, or take root and give lymph node metastases, from which, once again, some clones migrate outside and continue the process of diffusion and since the lymphatic system flows into the blood system, these cells can easily pass from one circle to another.

From a practical point of view, all this means that, when there is a neoplastic formation in a patient, there is a need to search for possible metastatic presence in adjacent lymph nodes. Specifically, it is the lymph node of the first station that is examined, i.e. the one that first drains the tumor territory, i.e. the so-called ** sentinel node**, which can be only one or more than one according to the anatomy of the lymphatic network of the affected area. Therefore, a marked contrast liquid (coloured/fluorescent or radioactive) is injected into the peritumoral area, highlighting the sentinel node and allowing its removal and subsequent analysis by the anatomopathologist to identify the possible presence of a metastasis. If it is not present (very rare) the diagnosis is defined early and the tumour is simply removed; if it is present, the treatment will be more complex and combined with radiotherapy/chemotherapy.
A typical example is breast cancer which, if associated with the external quadrant, can metastasize to the lymph nodes draining this area, i.e. those of the axillary cavity, while if the tumour involves the internal quadrant, the draining lymph nodes will be the mediastinal ones.

Swollen_Lymph_Nodes.jpg

Blood loss

Dissemination by blood presents strong similarities with lymphatic dissemination, at least in its initial processes. In fact, parallel to lymphoangiogenesis, tumor growth is even more marked and confusing angiogenesis, characterized by strong vasal expansion in the tumor parenchyma, associated with the presence of a fenestrated endothelium not coated with pericytes that facilitate the entry of tumor cells.
However, unlike the lymphatic system, there are several cellular elements in the blood that can interact with neoplastic cells. In particular, it has been shown that platelets are able to coat tumor cells and thus shield them from attacks by NK cells or antibodies. In addition, a number of growth factors with trophic function for neoplastic cells are present in the platelets, thus promoting their survival in the bloodstream.
Tumor cells thus spread throughout the entire circulatory system and continue to be carried by the bloodstream until they stop, which can happen for two reasons:

  • They become blocked by sterile encumbrance when the diameter of the vessel is smaller than the diameter of the cell mass, which usually happens in the microcirculation.

  • They block as a consequence of receptor recognition in the endothelium.

The moment the cells adhere to the endothelium and block (creating a "metastatic nicchia") they are recalled in the affected neutrophil district, and then macrophages, which activate the endothelium allowing the diapedesis of the cells and secrete a series of cytokines that can act as survival factors for the tumor.
Another characteristic, recently discovered, which facilitates dissemination by blood, is the fact that in the tumor mass, some vessels of neosynthesis are incomplete and the blood flows within channels delimited by the tumor cells themselves, which differentiate into endothelium-like cells. However, the reasons for this are still unknown.

When the tumor cells, after being disseminated, arrive in a new tissue and adhere, they undergo a reverse process to the one that made them tumor-like, i.e. a ** mesenchymal-epithelial retrotransition** takes place in order to promote adhesion. In fact, proteins such as cytokeratins are re-expressed instead of vimentins: the tumor cells lose their migratory capacity and at the same time their adhesion is facilitated.
Moreover, a neoplasm, even if originating from a single cell, for various mutations has different cell lines inside it, all of which have the same possibility of spreading. What differentiates them is that not all of them have the same metastatic capacities: in fact, there are some cells whose mutations have made them more aggressive and favour these capacities. So these will then be selected already at the blood or lymphatic level (according to the way of dissemination) and will be able to give all the processes seen so far.

How_metastasis_occurs_illustration.jpg

This theory was confirmed and demonstrated by I.J. Fidler, who grafted melanomas into several mice and after waiting for them to metastasize, took some metastatic cells from specific organs and re-culturated them in other mice, repeating this process several times.
What emerges is that with each inoculation of the cells, each one is more aggressive and gives metastases faster than the one that preceded it.

From the analysis of various tumors it has been seen that based on the anatomical district from which the tumor originates, the metastases will preferentially occur in specific points of the body; for example, statistically speaking, breast tumors give in most cases metastases in the bone marrow or lungs, colon tumors instead go to the liver, while those to the pancreas affect lungs or liver.
Two theories were initially formulated to explain this evidence:

  • Theory of the filter organ: According to this theory, the site of metastasis depends on the anatomy of the body. For example, if you take a colon tumor, it drains through the venous system into the portal vein, which flows into the liver, where a capillary network distributes the waste blood throughout its parenchyma, thus increasing the chance of the tumor taking root.
    In the same way, tumours in the lungs can, always through the venous system, passing through the left heart, spread in the systemic circle and preferentially spread in the brain, etc.;

  • Theory of seed in the soil: this theory is based on the principle that a seed germinates only if the soil allows it and is suitable, so that, paraphrasing, a tumor mass evolves into actual metastasis only if the surrounding microenvironment is favourable.

Today it is thought that the most plausible explanation is given by the combination of these two theories: as far as the rooting phase is concerned, it depends on anatomical bases, while the metastatic growth is essentially influenced by the microenvironment (through growth factors, trophic substances...).

In addition to this, with regard to the adhesion site, the presence of a receptor-specific recognition mechanism has been highlighted, according to which, for example, cells of a breast tumor, expressing the CXCR4 receptor, manage to take root at the lung level because the CXCL12 ligand is produced here; again, melanoma cells express CCR10 that binds** CCL27** present in skin cells, which is why melanomas often metastasize in the skin.

Sources

cancer.net

airc

news-medical

iss

fondazioneserono

albanesi

eupati

msdmanuals


Pictures

Img1

Img2

Img3


Metastasi


Con il termine “metastasi” si fa riferimento alla possibilità di un processo tumorale di riprodursi a distanza nell'organismo, sfruttando le proprietà d’invasività che le cellule assumono nel corso della loro trasformazione tumorale, permettendo al tumore di raggiungere per via sistemica qualsiasi organo e far nascere in tal sede nuove strutture neoplastiche che prendono per l’appunto il nome di metastasi.

374pxMetastasis_sites_for_common_cancers.svg.png

Le vie che le cellule tumorali sfruttano per dare metastasi sono essenzialmente tre:

Disseminazione in cavità (o transcelomatica)

Questa via riguarda la possibilità di un tumore di diffondere all’interno delle cavità sierose, come la cavità pleurica, peritoneale e pericardica.
Ciò avviene nel momento in cui le cellule tumorali, espandendosi, raggiungono la superfice dell’organo nel quale sono originate, affacciandosi sulla cavità sierosa e qui tramite l’azione di enzimi protolitici una di queste cellule, o un loro gruppo, si stacca dalla massa principale e cade nella sierosa. Una volta nella sierosa le cellule risulteranno fluttuanti, poiché non adese ad alcun tipo di matrice extracellulare, comportando la morte del maggior numero di esse. Alcune invece, che si sono evolute in modo tale da sopperire a questa necessità, si selezionano e sopravvivono, riuscendo infine ad attecchire al mesotelio della sierosa dando inizio a alla formazione di possibili nuclei di metastasi.

Una volta formatesi le metastasi transcelomatiche comportano un aumento locale del fattore VEGF, con conseguente aumento dela permeabilità capillare portando alla fuoriuscita di essudato e quindi causando edemi o asciti, in relazione al distretto anatomico al quale si riferisce. Tale liquido, ricco in proteine, può anche contenere le stesse cellule neoplastiche fautrici della sua formazione, aumentando così la possibilità di disseminazione di queste ultime.
La presenza nell’essudato di tali cellule tumorali viene sfruttata, tramite aspirazione e conseguente analisi, come strumento di diagnosi.

Esempi sono dati dai carcinomi dello stomaco, colon e ovaio che possono metastatizzare in cavità peritoneale, mentre i carcinomi della mammella, polmone e esofago nella cavità pleurica e/o pericardica.

Disseminazione per via linfatica

Rappresenta il tipo di disseminazione più frequente ed è principalmente favorito dalla linfoangiogenesi che caratterizza una formazione neoplastica. Durante i processi evolutivi della crescita tumorale si viene infatti a creare una nuova rete linfatica peritumorale i cui vasi si caratterizzano, come avviene fisiologicamente nei vasi linfatici, per la presenza di un endotelio fenestrato, in quanto la loro funzione consiste nel drenaggio dei fluidi. Per tal motivo dunque le cellule neoplastiche che già di per sé hanno forti capacità migratorie e invasive, riescono facilmente a penetrare i vasi e sfruttare la rete linfatica per disseminarsi.
Nel momento in cui le cellule tumorali entrano in un vaso linfatico e incontrano lungo il loro percorso un linfonodo, vengono bloccate, in quanto morfologicamente il linfonodo funziona come un filtro e le confina al suo interno. Qui le cellule possono o subire l’azione da parte di linfociti che le eliminano, o attecchire e dare metastasi linfonodale, dalle quale, ancora una volta, alcuni cloni migrano all’esterno e continuano il processo di diffusione ed dato che che il sistema linfatico confluisce in quello ematico, tali cellule possono facilmente passare da un circolo all’altro.

Da un punto di vista pratico, tutto ciò comporta che, nel momento in cui si riscontra una formazione neoplastica in un paziente, ci sia la necessità di ricercare eventuali presenze metastatiche nei linfonodi adiacenti. Nello specifico, a essere esaminato, è il linfonodo di prima stazione, cioè quello che per primo drena il territorio tumorale, ovvero il cosiddetto linfonodo sentinella, che può essere uno solo o più di uno in base all’anatomia della rete linfatica dell’area interessata. Si agirà dunque utilizzando un liquido di contrasto marcato (colorato/fluorescente o radioattivo) che viene iniettato nella zona peritumorale evidenziando il linfonodo sentinella e permettendone l’asportazione e la successiva analisi da parte dell’anatomopatologo per identificare l’eventuale presenza di una metastasi. Se non sarà presente (molto raro) la diagnosi si definisce precoce e si procede semplicemente alla rimozione del tumore; se presente invece, il trattamento sarà più complesso e combinato a radioterapia/chemioterapia.
Un esempio tipico è dato dal tumore mammario che, se associato al quadrante esterno può metastatizzare nei linfonodi drenanti tale area, cioè quelli del cavo ascellare, mentre nel caso in cui invece il tumore coinvolga il quadrante interno, i linfonodi drenanti saranno quelli mediastinici.

Swollen_Lymph_Nodes.jpg

Disseminazione per via ematica

La disseminazione per via ematica presenta forti analogie con quella linfatica, almeno nei suoi processi iniziali. Infatti, parallelamente alla linfoangiogenesi, nella crescita tumorale si ha una ancor più marcata e confusionale angiogenesi, caratterizzata da forte espansione vasale nel parenchima tumore, associata alla presenza di un endotelio fenestrato e non rivestito da periciti che facilitano l’ingresso delle cellule tumorali.
A differenza però del sistema linfatico, nel sangue sono presenti diversi elementi cellulari che possono interagire con le cellule neoplastiche. In particolare si è visto che le piastrine sono in grado di rivestire le cellule tumorali e schermarle così da eventuali attacchi da parte di cellule NK o anticorpi. Inoltre nelle piastrine sono presenti una serie di fattori di crescita con funzione trofica per le cellule neoplastiche, favorendone dunque la sopravvivenza nel torrente ematico.
Le cellule tumorali si diffondono così lungo tutto il sistema circolatorio e continuano a esser trasportate dal flusso sanguigno fino al momento in cui non si arrestano, fatto che può avvenire per due motivi:

  • Si bloccano per ingombro sterico nel momento in cui il diametro del vaso è minore di quello della massa cellulare, fatto che avviene solitamente nel microcircolo.

  • Si bloccano in conseguenza ad un riconoscimento recettoriale nell’endotelio.

Nel momento in cui le cellule aderiscono all’endotelio e si bloccano (creando una “nicchia metastatica”) sono richiamati nel distretto interessato neutrofili, e in un secondo momento macrofagi, che attivano l’endotelio permettendo la diapedesi delle cellule e che secernono una serie di citochine che possono fungere da fattori di sopravvivenza per il tumore.
Altra caratteristica, recentemente scoperta, che facilita la disseminazione per via ematica, è il fatto che nella massa tumorale, alcuni vasi di neosintesi sono incompleti e il sangue fluisce all’interno di canali delimitati dalle cellule tumorali stesse che si differenziano in cellule endotelio-simili. I motivi per cui ciò avvenga sono però ancora ignoti.

Nel momento in cui le cellule tumorali, dopo essersi disseminate, arrivano in un nuovo tessuto e aderiscono, subiscono un processo inverso a quello che le ha rese tumorali, cioè avviene una retrotransizione mesenchimale-epiteliale, col fine di favorire l’adesione. Vengono, infatti, riespresse proteine come le citocheratine al posto delle vimentine: le cellule tumorali perdono così le capacità migratorie, e al contempo ne è facilitata l’adesione.
Inoltre una neoplasia, pur originando da una singola cellula, per varie mutazioni presenta al suo interno differenti linee cellulari, le quali hanno tutte la stessa possibilità di diffondersi. Ciò che le diversifica è che non tutte hanno le stesse capacità metastatizzanti: infatti ci sono alcune cellule le cui mutazioni le hanno rese più aggressive e ne favoriscono tali capacità. Quindi queste saranno poi selezionate già a livello ematico o linfatico (in base alla via di disseminazione) e saranno in grado di dare tutti i processi visti finora.

How_metastasis_occurs_illustration.jpg

Questa teoria è stata confermata e dimostrata da I.J. Fidler, il quale ha innestato in diversi topi dei melanomi e dopo aver atteso che questi metastatizzassero, ha prelevato alcune cellule metastatiche da precisi organi e le ha rinocultate in altri topi, ripetendo poi tale processo più volte.
Ciò che emerge, è che ad ogni inoculazione delle cellule, ognuna è più aggressiva e dà metastasi più rapidamente di quella che l’ha preceduta.

Dall’analisi di vari tumori si è visto che sulla base del distretto anatomico dal quale il tumore origina, le metastasi avverranno preferenzialmente in specifici punti dell’organismo; per esempio, statisticamente parlando, tumori mammari danno nella maggior parte dei casi metastasi nel midollo osseo o polmoni, i tumori al colon invece si portano verso il fegato, mentre quelli al pancreas colpiscono polmoni o fegato.
Per spiegare questa evidenza erano state inizialmente formulate due teorie:

  • Teoria dell’organo filtro: secondo tale teoria la sede della metastasi dipende dall’anatomia dell’organismo. Per esempio, se si prende un tumore al colon, questo tramite il sistema venoso drena nella vena porta, che sfocia nel fegato, dove una rete capillare distribuisce in tutto il suo parenchima il sangue refluo, andando così ad aumentare la possibilità di attecchimento del tumore.
    Allo stesso modo, tumori ai polmoni possono, sempre tramite sistema venoso, passando dal cuore sinistro, diffondersi nel circolo sistemico e disseminarsi preferenzialmente nel cervello ecc;

  • Teoria del seme nel suolo: questa teoria poggia le sue fondamenta sul principio secondo il quale un seme germoglia solo se il suolo lo consente ed è adatto, per cui, parafrasando, una massa tumorale si evolve in effettiva metastasi solo se il microambiente che la circonda è favorevole.

Oggi si pensa che la spiegazione più plausibile sia data dall’insieme di queste due teorie: per quanto riguarda la fase di attecchimento, questa dipende da basi anatomiche, mentre la crescita metastatica è essenzialmente influenzata dal microambiente (tramite fattori di crescita, sostanze trofiche…).

In aggiunta a ciò, relativamente alla sede di adesione, è stata evidenziata la presenza di un meccanismo di riconoscimento recettore-specifico, secondo il quale, per esempio, cellule di un tumore mammario, esprimendo il recettore CXCR4, riescono ad attecchire a livello polmonare in quanto qui viene prodotto il ligando CXCL12; ancora, cellule di melanoma esprimono CCR10 che lega** CCL27** presente nelle cellule cutanee, motivo per cui i melanomi metastatizzano spesso in cute.


Fonti

cancer.net

airc

news-medical

iss

fondazioneserono

albanesi

eupati

msdmanuals


Immagini

Img1

Img2

Img3

Authors get paid when people like you upvote their post.
If you enjoyed what you read here, create your account today and start earning FREE STEEM!
STEEMKR.COM IS SPONSORED BY
ADVERTISEMENT